Saturday, August 24, 2013

Barefoot.

So of course NF didn't pull Bobby's shoes when he returned Thursday. He did leave me a very endearing note on the board in response to my plea to take them off himself:

"Not today, but soon."

Soon, NF? Would soon be in three weeks when Bobby was due for a reset? Or would soon be six weeks when you actually got around to showing up? I can only assume that regardless of a time frame, soon really means when he's ripped his shoes off and taken half his foot with them.

Raging with hormones, I dug out my rasp and accepted BM's pair of nail pullers from under her car seat (proving to be a true horsewoman, especially since all of her ponies are barefoot), and I got to work on yanking steel. I was sweating like I had just run a marathon in the Amazon, but they eventually all came off. It helped that Bobby put up with my awkward maneuvering of his legs. Eventually I just set his hind legs on an overturned water bucket and he rested them there as I pulled out nails. It also helped that when I got around to the LF, I pulled out one nail, pulled the second nail, and the whole shoe came with it. Yeah, he definitely could have waited.


bitch, please.

Bobby's feet smelled awful once the shoes were off--like rotting foot. I know some people at the barn don't agree with me pulling his shoes, but I am so glad I did. I have both Farrier Barrier and Double Strength Farrier's Formula on the way. BO also suggested Knox Gelatine, so I bought a big box of that yesterday and started him on two packets a day. I'd never heard of using it before, but I'm willing to try anything at this point.

front feet. 

Yesterday I freed him from his pen and he went bucking around the arena like a wild man without a short step. At least that footing agrees with him. I took him for a field trip to the barn and he was a little short walking up the driveway, but not nearly as bad as I thought he was going to be.

visiting with friends. 

I jumped on him once we were back in the indoor with just his halter and lead on and we walked around for ten minutes. He didn't feel off, so I'm hopeful that once my foot is better we can do some work in there. In the meantime, I've begun the painful search for a legitimate barefoot farrier. Not holding my breath, though maybe I'll get lucky.

his current "stall"

In the meantime, Bobby is enjoying wandering in and out of his pen at free will, eating extra hay to make up for lack of grazing time, and getting fed cookies for no reason.

19 comments:

  1. Woohoo, come join the barefoot movement!

    Also, nice job taking things into your own hands. Sometimes in the horse world, you've just got to do what you know is right, even if others don't agree.

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  2. Wow, I am shocked that his feet were managing to hold shoes at all. The split on the toe shows just how much pressure the hoof was under on the quarters. I'm curious to see pics of the underside, if you have a chance.

    You probably know this, but his feet are going to chip BAD over the next week as he self-trims and the loose bits are knocked off, so don't panic. But it looks like above the nail holes, he's got a good hoof in there. He'll grow it out in no time!

    If there's a bad smell, he probably has thrush and/or WLD in all sorts of places. You might try soaking in CleanTrax for a while. If he's got thrush deep in or around the frog, my trimmer recommends a mixture of triple antibiotic ointment and antifungal cream, squirted in there with a syringe. You can then stuff a bit of cotton in on top with your hoofpick, to keep the dirt out of it. It's a pain to do daily but MAN it cleans up the deep thrush fast.

    Good luck, and good for you!

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    1. They are chipping something awful! It's nice to read that's normal. I expected some, but jeeze.

      I did give him a heavy squirt of Thrush Buster in all 4s, and it's been bone dry here so I'm hoping they'll stay dry enough until the Farrier Barrier gets here.

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    2. I'm also a Thrush Buster fan but I haven't had any luck with it getting the deep-down stuff. I hope it works for you - if not, definitely try some of the stronger stuff.

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  3. I second Jenj, he's got a lot to chip off there! Your farrier sounds just awful so fingers crossed you find a new better one, geez. And definitely soak him with something - I love White Lightning personally. Good luck!

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  4. I bet he is so much happier with those shoes off!

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  5. Try turpentine on his feet.. It will help them harden up. I guess there is a greese version that's easier to paint on at my local tack store. Next time I'm there ill look for you- but the stuff at hardware stores does the trick too :)

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    1. I'm going to try Farrier Barrier and see if that helps him toughen up. I wonder if that's what you saw at your tack store.

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    2. hmm maybe... i'll have to check :)

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  6. Man. You are so hard core and that is so freaking awesome. Whereas I cried when the farrier screwed me over, you took the matter in to your own literal hands and got the job done.

    Also, "Not now, but soon" just sounds creepy and ominous.

    Here's to healthy hooves! (I asked if Archie could go barefoot and my farrier told me no, because of his ringbone.)

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    1. I cried too. And then I got really mad and got to throw shoes around and it made me feel better.

      And at least your farrier gave you a fucking reason for not pulling them instead of an ominous message!

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  7. Try the trimmers list at http://www.thehorseshoof.com. They are in alphabetical order by state. Trimmers tend to be more willing to travel than farriers. There is a decent number of trimmers in Pennsylvania per this list. And I agree: chipping is normal, esp while the nail holes are growing out. :)

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    1. I *think* I might have found a farrier kind of in the area. I need to do some sleuthing on him though.

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  8. My OTTB was barefoot for 3 years, jumping, trail riding, you name it. I finally get a AQH with "solid" feet and we start trail riding? BAM! Stone bruise abscess and now he needs shoes in the back as well as fronts until I build them up again. I'm so jealous.

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    1. My last horse, also an OTTB, got his shoes pulled the day I got him and he never once showed any discomfort no matter what footing we were on. I guess I couldn't get lucky twice in a row!

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  9. I'm sorry if I missed this, but have you tried Keratex hoof hardener? It's expensive, but it saved Limerick's feet when they were falling to shit earlier this summer.

    I'm very impressed that you pulled his shoes all by yourself... you're one tough lady!

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  10. You can paint his feet with turpentine too.

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  11. I second (or third) the turpentine (venice turpentine) for his feet. My farrier swears by it.

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  12. It makes me feel good to see those feet without shoes. The general shape of his feet look pretty good to me. I suspect that having no shoes, which will actually allow his feet to expand and contract as he moves, may just improve the bloodflow, and as a result, the structure of his feet.
    Good for you! Keep us updated! I'm very excited to see what those feet look like after 6 months without shoes!

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