Monday, April 24, 2017

The weekend strikes back

Those of you that are friends with me on facebook or follow me on instagram know what I was up to this weekend:

leaving the stable tour just before midnight.

One of my mom's oldest friends is a Cirque du Soleil fanatic, and he's been wanting to see Cavalia for ages. He lives out in the Bay Area but missed them when they were there, so when he saw they were in Chicago (where my mom lives) he invited us along. And then paid for the entire trip, VIP package second row center seats included. Ohhh-kay, if you're going to beg, I guess I can go.

Guys, it was fucking amazing. I had steeled myself against being judgmental against the riding as you will when seeing people fake it in movies. Yeah, no. I can't say I was as wowed by the haute ecole at the end as most of the audience was, but everything else was incredible. 11/10 would recommend. I can't say enough good things about it.

i was pretty giddy to be there, won't lie. 

I flew out first thing Saturday morning and landed back in Rochester Sunday afternoon. I was exhausted by the time I got home and even with a nap and a full night of sleep, this morning's 6am alarm went off way too early. Once I finished feeding, I chiseled Bobby out of his mud coat and got on fingers firmly crossed he'd be sound.

On Friday when I last saw him he was not sound. We'd had a tough-on-me lesson the day before (post on that to come), but we never even made it to the canter so I was kind of really a lot freaking out. If he can't even hold up to flatting on our cushy indoor footing, how the fuck is he going to show on stone dust? Fortunately Farrier was there doing another horse so I asked her to watch him go quick.

please stop being a fungusy gimp.

She agreed he looked uneven on the RF which was what I was feeling. I got off without doing anything more than the brief w/t/c soundness check and Farrier put the hoof testers on him. Of course, being Bobby, he tested worse on the LF. The LF is the worse navicular foot, but the RF is the leg with the old soft tissue injury and the still-recovering leg fungus. Farrier didn't come to any great conclusions.

Bobby isn't big on reactions on the ground. He's got such good ground manners drilled into him that he thinks it's his job to stand like a statue and never move. He jerked his hoof once each time Farrier hit a sore spot, but when she came back to the same spot he didn't so much as twitch. Occasionally he'd look back at me like, "Should I be doing something? Is this okay? I won't move again, I promise." Ugh, Bobby, for being such a drama queen under saddle, you're difficult in your own way on the ground.

I packed his feet and Farrier said to just keep riding him as normal. If he continues to be uncomfortable we'll go back to wedges. If he comes up sound, then great. This foot shit is a serious mind fuck, let me tell you.

we ride! for one day at least.

Fortunately he was sound this morning!

Unfortunately, I apparently can't take a weekend off without forgetting everything I know about riding. BM has given me about six months worth of things to work on in my past two lessons so I should have a wealth of things to draw on. Yeah, no. I couldn't get my tired brain to dredge up anything useful for a good fifteen minutes of wandering uselessly around at the walk. Even at the trot it took me way longer than it should have to start riding with a plan instead of being like, "I have legs. They push me up to post. That is all."

I did rally though. Once I started working on bending Bobby at the shoulders keeping my calves against his side instead of giving into his "Your leg means nothing or it means zoomies. There is no in between." I was able to get him moving really well.

hubby picked me up from the airport in my new car! so long, old saturn. 

Once again I ran into the flying change problem at the canter. He popped right over unasked for down the first long side--totally drama free, completely correctly, and in perfect balance. He was more than happy to pop right over as soon as I shifted my seat which again wasn't what I was asking for. If he's going to be change happy, he needs to remember there are other ways to get the lead. I can't do another change through the canter in the test to correct the lead, so he's got to work with me. I gave him a scratch anyway, then calmly brought him back to the walk and picked up the left lead again. Then, minutes later, I went to do a simple change across the diagonal--the move required at Second level--and he felt the half halt right before I asked for the walk and changed again.

I know having a horse that excels at changes is nothing to bitch about. The fact that he's decided that not only are they easy, but they're actually really fun is great. It's just not great when I'm not asking for them. I don't want to shut him down so, as always, we have to work on the whole listening thing instead of the anticipating thing.

"leave the dressaging to me, lady. you know nothing."

Of course once we got over to the right lead to actually stay there, he couldn't canter anymore. Honestly I don't even know what gait we were in. It felt like none of his body parts were moving together and yet everything was stuck nailed to a board. I finally just got into half seat and kicked him into a hand gallop. BM is always telling me to let him fail, so I let him fail hard. You can't make this circle without falling over or crashing into something if you won't bend, Bobby. You can't run fast if you're cross cantering. I was finally able to sink back down into my seat and work with a more forward, looser horse. It was a hot mess getting there, but the end result was where it needed to be.

It ended up being a good ride, but the amount of time it took me to sort out my body parts and what the fuck I was supposed to be doing was unacceptable. Mental toughness, it needs work.

19 comments:

  1. But he was rideable so yay? Lol. I like write ups from people who are ahead of us to remind myself that the meltdowns don't go away--they just happen over harder things.

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  2. Ugh I hear you on the mind fuck of mystery lamenesses. Bobby whyyyyy. Tho I also relate to the sensitive horse who figures out one trick really REALLY good and is pretty sure everything else is now really just a secret cue for that one trick.

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    1. He is the best at one trick until he inevitably decides that the one trick vastly offends him.

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  3. But you got there and that counts for something. :)

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  4. So jealous about Cavalia. I was in Chicago two weekends ago for baseball, but couldn't swing tickets. :(

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    1. Boo! Ponies are way better than baseball!

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  5. Wow you make Cavalia sound as good as everyone else makes it sound. Jealous! Sweet looking car, congrats! Bobby though, I feel you.

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    1. It was seriously amazing!! As I'm sure my car is as soon as I figure out how all its new fangled technology works lol

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  6. Uggghhhh, Bobby, nooooo. At least you rallied. I feel like that deserves a gold star.

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    1. I'll take any gold stars I cab get most days!

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  7. I've heard all amazing thing about Cavallia, I guess at some point I need to check it out. Sounds like a great time!
    I feel you with the soundness roller coaster. Ugh. Worst. Glad you finished on a good note though. Don't be too hard on yourself about the slow brain. Being tired does crazy things to you.

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  8. Cavalia & a new car?! Double win!!

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  9. OK next time you come to Chicago can we have a "navicular horses who only believe in zoomies" convention?

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  10. So jealous of your weekend at Cavalia! Yeah soundness issues are still a mind fuck to me. Hope everything works ok

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If you can't say anything nice, fuck off.